The imposing man in the picture above is Lt. Col. Harry Genet, OC of the 58th Battalion, CEF. Born in London, England on Feb, 20, 1864, Harry Genet eventually imigrated to Canada and settled in Brantford, Ontario, where he found work at the Adams Wagon Works as an accountant. Genet also found time to become the Commanding Officer of the 38th Dufferin Peel Rifles.

The Ministry of Militia ordered a battalion to be raised in the central Ontario region in May, 1915. By July, 1151 men had been recruited and were at Paradise Camp, Niagara-on-the-Lake. Lt.Col. Genet took on the mission of recruiting the officers for the battalion.

In the novel, Flowers of the Forest, Lt. Col. Genet and our football prodigy, Pte. Farquhar McLennan, come face to face at Paradise Camp. This is the start of a very complicated relationship that carries over to the Front in Belgium. I don’t want to give away too much here; I’ll let you read about it.

Genet suffered a war injury (sort of) when he was thrown from his horse in High Park, Toronto. He was treated for broken ribs and a separated shoulder. After a spell in Toronto, stationed at the CNE, the 58th moved to England in November, 1915. In Jan., 1916, they moved across the Channel to France. The next stop was the Ypres Salient, in Belgium.

In June, 1916, the Germans mounted an advance that pushed the Canadians out of an area called Sanctuary Wood. It was a bloody, embarrassing loss for the CEF. On June 13, 1916, the Canadians, with the 58th Battalion, attacked the German positions in Sanctuary Wood, pushed them back, and regained their old lines. This was a historic event for Canada. This was the first time a Canadian fighting unit had conducted an offensive mission in the theatre of war.

Only a short time later, Lt. Col. Harry Genet won the DSO (Distinguished Service Award) in a battle at Observatory Ridge. He also received further commendations during his service at the Front. Genet led the 58th at the Battle of the Somme, Vimy Ridge, Lens and Passchendaele. After Passchendaele, Genet left the 58th and the Front.

 

At the anniversary of their mobilization—June 23 1916—only seven officers re-
mained out of forty who sailed from Canada with the unit. The following extract of a letter received from Lieut.-Col. H. A. Genet will speak for itself:
“We certainly have had a very rough time of it.
Our losses have been severe, but the battalion did
splendidly, and we received commendation and
thanks from brigade and corps commanders, also
from army headquarters. The loss of so many of
our gallant fellows weighs heavily on me.”
Shortly afterwards the battalion was ordered to
a rest camp some distance in the rear to receive re-
inforcements, to reorganize and to recuperate.
After a period of rest the battalion, with the whole
Canadian corps, moved to the Somme front, where
added lustre has been won to the proud record made
in the defense of Ypres. Of the officers who went
from Brantford with the 58th Battalion, all, with
one exception, Lieut.Col. Genet, are on the casualty
lists. Major Ballachey, of loving memory, was
killed in action. Major F. Hicks, a splendidly effi-
cient officer, was wounded in the knee. Lieut. J. R.
Cornelius, keen, enthusiastic and thorough, is suffer-
ing from shell shock. He has been recommended
for the Military Cross. Lieut. J. A. Pearce, the sig-
nalling officer, who did his difficult and dangerous
work so well that the Colonel in a letter writes:
“Pearce I have recommended for the Military Cross,
and I have no doubt he will get it,” is home on sick
leave after being wounded. Lieut. W. J. Wallace,
another of the battalion’s capable and highly-
thought-of officers, is lying seriously ill, suffering

from a multiplicity of wounds.

Brantford has great cause to be proud of her
gallant officers and men. One would like to speak
in detail of the courage and heroism evinced by the
men in the ranks, equally as great and worthy of
mention as that of the officers. To one and all we
bear our tribute. “Where duty called or danger”
they never were wanting. They have left an example
worthy of emulation to their comrades who may fol-
low them along the hard, but noble, road to victory and peace.
 The Lt. Col. survived the Great War and returned to Canada to resume his career. He had a son, John Ernest Genet, who also became a Lt. Col. in the First Canadian Divisional Signals in the Second World War.

Harry Genet eventually returned to England and took up residence in Mervstham. His life came to an end on March 17, 1946. We shall remember.

www.doingourbit.ca/profile/harry-genet-dso

 

geach_stanley_0157

His death card.

 

On a completely different note. This post came up on Facebook yesterday to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the death in action of this soldier.

Lance Corporal Richard Law

Posted by Flowers of the Forest - The Pride of Our Land

I am a retired Math Professor and now a budding author. Who would have thought? I was born in Toronto and grew up in a family of 5 boys and 1 girl. I went to Winchester Street Public School up to grade 8 and then attended Jarvis Collegiate Institute, up to grade 13. After high school I attended the University of Toronto and graduated with 2 degrees (BA honours and BEd). Following was a career in teaching, including 34 years at Humber College in Toronto, teaching Mathematics and Statistics. I managed to coauthor one textbook, an introductory Stats book. I am married to the beautiful Beth and have a great loving son named Jonathan McLaren Law. Oh yes, I am a lifelong Toronto Maple Leafs fan. I lived happily in Bolton in beautiful Caledon ON for 31 years, and I am now living in Burlington ON and loving it too. The book is available on Amazon.ca, Chapters - Indigo and Barnes & Noble.

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