Paradise Part 2

OK, pay attention now, so here we are, back to Paradise Camp, in Niagara-on-the-Lake. Some very notable Canadians attended Paradise Camp for officer training before the War. One of them was Vincent Massey, who much later became Governor General of Canada. Another notable was Percival Molson, of beer fame and having a stadium named after him at McGill University. And a third, but not the least was Nobel Prize winner, Fredrick Banting.

In the summer of 1915, when Pte. Farquhar McLennan enlisted, the group of men at Paradise Camp was part of, what was called, the Second Contingent. The men that went overseas at the beginning of the Great War, in the fall of 1914, all expected to be home by Christmas. Nobody foresaw the shape this war would take. Casualties began to mount very quickly and the government realized that more men would need to be recruited. Thus began the Second Contingent.

A battalion consists of roughly 1000 men and officers. In 1915, the camp was attended by the 35th, 36th, 37th, 58th, 74th, 75th, 76th, 81st, 83rd, 84th, 86th Machine-Gun, 92nd, and the Canadian Army Medical Corp (CAMC). There was a total of around 12000 men.

The camp was established with two campuses; one at the Commons and the other one just north of Niagara-on-the-Lake, at Fort Mississauga. The musketry range was on the north campus.

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Fort Mississauga, Niagara-on-the-Lake. Two soldiers, Pte. Bateman and Pte. Scott of the 75th inscribed their names into the soft brick of the entrance to the sally port. Still there for all to see.
Overseas Draft
Overseas draft, August 1915.

The picture above is of the “overseas draft”. It was becoming very apparent that the men at the Front were falling faster than they were being replaced. Therefore in August of 1915, a draft was conducted at Paradise camp and this group of men were sent overseas ahead of time. If you look closely at the picture, the men are wearing some of their field gear.

A typical day of training would consist of waking up at 4:30 AM, dressing, followed by breakfast at the mess tents. Morning drills would start with parade drills, beginning with the smallest units (sections, platoons) and progressing up to the largest units (company and battalion). The afternoons would be taken up with combat skills, such as, hand to hand combat, bayonet, target practice artillery or signaling. Fridays were reserved for the long 12 mile (approx) route marches. There was a choice of two; either to Queenston Heights or to Port Dalhousie. Saturdays were for sports and leisure and Sunday was for Divine Service and Church Parades. Families would come to visit the men on Sundays.

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58th Battalion Football team. Farquhar is seen in the back row, third from the right.

Sports played a very important role in the training and development of troops. It was encouraged for fitness and teamwork. Battalions and Companies participated in many tournaments for prizes and trophies. Great rivalries developed between the battalions. The uniforms that you see in this picture were donated by the YMCA. The “Y” played a huge role in supplying equipment to the men for these activities. This picture, by the way, is the one that I chose to put on the cover of the book, “Flowers of the Forest – The Pride of Our Land”. 

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